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Plant of the Week #3: Pinus cembra

Since last week I introduced you to a relatively recent introduction to the North American gardening landscape (the goumi, Elaeagnus multiflora, which you can read all about right here) that can only be cultivated in the warmer parts of Canada (namely southern Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes), so I thought that It would only be fair to the rest of the country to bring your attention his week to one of many nut producing pines, the stone pine (Pinus cembra) which can be successfully grown throughout most of Canada. (more…)

Foraging Fun: Ganoderma tsugae

Although it is most certainly not June outside (as much as I would like for it to be) I couldn’t help but write a post about the first time that I encountered Ganoderma tsugae, a strikingly beautiful and highly medicinal mushroom back in the hot, humid deciduous forests of southern Ontario back in 2015. This is exactly what happens when you take so many photos of plants and fungi on your excursions during the summer and can’t get to them all in season. (more…)

Yarrow Metheglin: Tasting Notes

I can’t believe that it took me this long to get back into mead making. We’re talking at least a couple of years, which is considerably longer than what I would have preferred. Upon having my first glass of this ferment, which is brewed with no more than ‘one handful’ of dried yarrow herb I am pleasantly surprised by how much I missed mead and didn’t notice. I totally let mead making slide and am firmly committing to not letting that happen. I encourage you all to hold me accountable. (more…)

Foraging Fun: Flammulina velutipes

Judging from the featured photo above you probably wouldn’t believe me if I were to tell you that these are ekokitake mushrooms, the exact same species as can be found in a wide variety of traditional east Asian dishes. However, I am most certainly not in any position here as an educator of sorts to be misleading anyone, especially when it comes to wild mushrooms, as there is a very good reason for that. The above photo depicts that average habit of wild enokitake and not the cultivated form. Allow me to explain.. (more…)