mushrooms

Mushroom Cultivation: Cardboard Spawn

It has been quite a while since I last experimented with oyster mushrooms, and even longer since I decided to take note of my methods and record them all to then post here at your convenience as well as for my own record keeping. Indeed the pervasive nature and tenacity of the mycological world couldn’t keep me away for too long before the urges of wonder and discovery had me crawling back for more. (more…)

Cultivating King Stropharia: Part 2

After what has seemed like an eternity, or rather that feeling of hopeless anticipation which sometimes follows what you think has been a failure, my king stropharia (Stropharia rugosoannulata) patch produced it’s first flush of mushrooms despite all odds. I was astonished that the colony actually survived considering the trials and tribulations that it has endured since when I wrote about growing these mushrooms in Growing King Stropharia: Part 1. (more…)

Foraging Fun: Agaricus campestris

The Meadow mushroom (Agaricus campestris) is a close relative of the button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) but processes a complex life cycle and requires a specific enough habitat so as to have so far evaded extensive cultivation and remains a treasure of wild (or at least semi-wild) spaces. (more…)

Foraging Fun: Climacodon septentrionalis

One of the things that I love most about foraging is that one always comes across the unexpected, each and every time without fail. There is always something new, even for some who like myself have spent just shy of 10 years rummaging through wild spaces with one eye out for something new to taste, heal or in any sort of way experience. Although southern Ontario may not be one of the most relished hot spots for fungi given our hot and often dry summers, for someone new to the world of fungi there are many mysterious and wonderful encounters awaiting. (more…)

Growing Oyster Mushrooms from Wild Grasses

I consider myself to be quite opportunistic, readily willing to identify and take advantage of the potential benefits of any given circumstance, no matter how bleak or uncomfortable they appear from the outside. This being said, I got to thinking about one of the most popular commercial substrates for commercial oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) production, straw, and whether or not the old, dried, fibrous stalks and leaves of various wild or naturalized grass species could be used in much the same way as straw derived from commercial cereal grain crops. So I decided to put on my mushroom cap and put this one to the test myself. (more…)